Thursday, March 15, 2012

2517.txt

date: Mon, 12 Apr 1999 13:06:05 -0400 (EDT)
from: mannatXYZxyzw.geo.umass.edu
subject: perspectives
to: k.briffaatXYZxyz.ac.uk

Dear Keith,

THanks for your message--I will look forward to receiving it (tell
Tim to FAX it to the FAX below ASAP. I leave also for a week for EGS
April 16-21st, and will be busy for a couple days upon my return, so
the sooner the better). I have, as mentioned in previous message,
incorporate the correct re-worked version of your n. hem density
series into the featured IPCC plot comparing the different estimates,
and the comparison is indeed much better. Will let you know where you
can download the revised figure for your own inspection...

With regard to the question you asked, the composite of all of the
series which make up Gordon's NOrthern treeline was used. Admittedly,
only a handfull go back before 1500, and only one all the way back
to AD 1400. So the "sampling" contributing to the NT composite does
decrease back in time. What is remarkable is that, even with this
limiation, the similarity between the low-frequency signal in the NT
composite and the ITRDB PC #1 is stunning---until the 19th century.
This is telling us something profound, I believe...

Anyways, will look forward to seeing the piece and the sooner Tim can
get it to me, the more likely I can return some comments before I have
to leave for 1 week+ on friday morning.

Thanks again,

mike
_______________________________________________________________________
Michael E. Mann
________Current_____________________________Starting Fall 1999_________
Adjunct Assistant Professor | Assistant Professor
Department of Geosciences | Dept. of Environmental Sciences
Morrill Science Center | Clark Hall
University of Massachusetts | University of Virginia
Amherst, MA 01003 | Charlottesville, VA 22903
_________________________________|_____________________________________
e-mail: mannatXYZxyz.umass.edu; memannatXYZxyzan.oit.umass.edu (attachments)
Phone: (413) 545-9573 FAX: (413) 545-1200
http://www.geo.umass.edu/climate/mike

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