Saturday, March 17, 2012

2573.txt

cc: tar_laatXYZxyzth.usgcrp.gov, tar_revedatXYZxyzth.usgcrp.gov, wgii.bureauatXYZxyzth.usgcrp.gov, ddokken@earth.usgcrp.gov
date: Thu, 15 Oct 1998 18:27:58 -0500
from: ddokkenatXYZxyzcrp.gov (Dave Dokken)
subject: Approved SRLFC Outline
to: tar_claatXYZxyzth.usgcrp.gov

IPCC SPECIAL REPORT
Land Use, Land-Use Change, and Forestry

The Special Report on Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry is
being prepared in response to a request from SBSTA at its Eighth Session
(Bonn, 2-12 June 1998).

The outline of the IPCC Special Report on Land Use, Land Use Change
and Forestry was approved by the IPCC Panel at its Fourteenth Session.
This outline responds to the SBSTA mandate and addresses issues raised in
FCCC/SBSTA/1998/INF1.

It has been designed to provide scientific, technical, economic and
social information that can assist governments operationalize Article 3.3
of the Kyoto Protocol. In addition it will provide information relevant to
assessing the potential for other human-induced additional activities as
mentioned in Article 3.4 and issues associated with operationalizing this
Article. It also provides information relevant to other Articles of the
Kyoto Protocol. While the Speciaql Report will primarily focus on carbon
dioxide, it should address methane and nitrous oxide as appropriate.

The Special Report will be policy relevant, but will not be policy
prescriptive.

The IPCC Panel has approved the topics that need to be addressed in
the Special Report, but will allow the lead authors to re-organize the
outline to minimize duplication of topics and ensure the most logical flow
of information. The IPCC Panel did request that the outlines of the
chapters dealing with Articles 3.3 and 3.4 be as parallel as possible. The
Panel also recognized that the content of different chapters is closely
linked, therefore, noting that many chapters will need to have common lead
authors to ensure consistency. In addition, there is a need for common
lead authors with the relevant chapters in the Third Assessment Report.

The Special Report on Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry will
be approved and accepted by the Panel meeting in a Plenary Session since it
cuts across the three working groups and the task force on National
Greenhouse Gas Inventories (TFI). The procedures for the preparation,
review, acceptance, approval and publication of IPCC Special Reports shall
apply.

The Special Report will be chaired by R. Watson and guided by two
"overall co-ordinating lead authors". Each chapter will have one or two
co-ordinating lead authors in addition to numerous lead and contributing
authors. There will be a steering committee for this Special Report
comprising of the IPCC Chair, two IPCC Bureau members from each working
group (one of the co-chairs and one vice chair) and the chair of the task
force on inventories who will approve the selection of co-ordinating lead
authors and lead authors and oversee the whole process. The Secretary of
the IPCC and the heads of the working group technical support units will be
ex-officio members of the steering committee. There will be a one-person
technical support unit for this report located with the Chair, IPCC
Secretary or one of the working group technical support units (funding and
the identification of the individual for this position has yet to be
identified).


IPCC Special Report
Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry


Summary for Policymakers (5-10 pages)

Chapter 1 - Introduction and Mandate (2 pages)

This chapter will briefly discuss the SBSTA mandate and the relationship of
this Special Report to the IPCC Third Assessment Report.

* Chapter 2 - Global Perspective (10 pages)
This chapter will be a primer to explain how the carbon cycle operates, and
the potential to influence the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse
gases by land-use activities.

Executive Summary
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Biogeochemical Cycles (global stocks, flows, processes, timescales
and uncertainties)
2.3. Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Role of Management (sources, sinks
and stocks by land cover type, land-use and region)
2.4. Global Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions and Sequestration
Potential (competition for land)
2.5. Features of Global Carbon Models and National Inventories

Chapter 3 - Implications of Different Definitions and Generic Issues (30
pages)

This chapter will focus on exploring the implications of different
definitions on the Kyoto Protocol, the different methodologies that can be
employed to measure and assess carbon stocks and pools, and issues
associated with accounting and reporting.

Executive Summary
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Implications of Different Definitions by Broad Category (e.g.,
forests, afforestation, reforestation, deforestation, forest degradation,
sustainable forest management, restoration of degraded lands, agriculture
and land practices, and full carbon accounting and its anthropogenic
implications)
3.3 Measurement of Above and Below Ground Biomass and Soil Carbon
(stocks -- remote sensing and in-situ; flows -- direct flux measurements
and stock differences; accuracy and precision; verifiability; propagation
of errors; effects of contiguous and non-contiguous commitment periods;
integration and consistency of methods -- national inventories and
modeling).
3.4 Accounting and Reporting Issues (Direct human-induced vs indirect
human-induced vs natural; program vs project activities; baselines - 1990
baselines, 1990-2007 baselines; stock differences 2012-2008; attribution of
stocks and changes in stocks -- pre-1990 vs post-1990 activities; fires and
pests; permanence, additionality; leakage; techniques for treating
uncertainties; and costs of accounting and reporting).

Chapter 4: Afforestation, Reforestation and Deforestation Activities --
Article 3.3 (25 pages)

This chapter will address a wide range of scientific and technical issues
and options associated with Article 3.3 by region.

Executive Summary
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Options for definitions and their general implications
(afforestation, reforestation and deforestation)
4.3 Processes, timescales, and carbon accounting rules (pools; spatial
scales -- project to biome to national inventory; direct vs
indirect)
4.4 Data needs for operationalizing afforestation, reforestation and
deforestation activities (observational and modelling methods for
area change in land use and carbon stock for different time periods;
operational implications of uncertainties; sensitivity analysis of
uncertainties; verification)
4.5 Data availability (ground, aircraft and satellite data for land
use/cover and carbon stocks in all pools by ecosystem - at the project,
biome and national inventory scale; accuracy and precision; costs;
models)
4.6 Regional and global potentials, differences and implications of
afforestation, reforestation and deforestation activities (by pool;
activity type -- policies, practices, and technologies; Annex I
countries and by region)
4.7 Associated impacts of afforestation, reforestation and
deforestation activities (environmental -- biodiversity, soil
quality, watersheds, etc. and socio-economic -- poverty, employment,
resettlement, agriculture, forestry, etc.)

Chapter 5: Additional Human-Induced Activities -- Article 3.4 (30 pages)

This chapter will address a wide range of issues associated with assessing
the potential of additional human-induced activities mentioned in Article
3.4. It will also address issues that would arise in operationalizing
Article 3.4.

Executive Summary
5.1 Introduction (implications of Kyoto Protocol; ancillary benefits;
sequestration, emissions reductions and substitution potential; additional
human-induced activities -- Arable, Pastoral and Forestry Land Management,
Restoration of Degraded Lands, Protected Areas, Agroforestry, Urban
Expansion and Infrastructure, Modern Biomass Energy, etc.)
5.2 Processes, timescales and carbon accounting rules (pools; spatial
scales -- project to biome to national inventory; direct vs indirect;
temporary vs long-term sequestration)
5.3 Data needs for operationalizing Article 3.4 activities (past,
present and projected land - use activities and cover; carbon pools;
project and program; observational and modelling methods for
area change in land use and carbon stock for different time periods;
operational implications of uncertainties; sensitivity analysis of
uncertainties; verification)
5.4 Potential magnitude of carbon sinks and sources by activity type,
regionally and globally (barriers; costs and benefits; short vs
long-term sequestration, including threats to permanence; accounting
rules; detailed table on types of current land use and practices which
have implications for C; detailed table on types of land use change and
conversion; highlight important changes; competition for land;
evolution vs additional activities)
5.6 Land Use and its relationship to carbon and energy (modern biomass
and energy- intensive materials -- tables of specific options)
5.7 Associated impacts of additional activities (environmental --
biodiversity, soil quality, watersheds, etc. and socio-economic --
poverty, employment, resettlement, agriculture, forestry, etc.)

Chapter 6: Project Based Activities (10 pages)

This chapter will address the unique issues associated with project-based
activities related to the Kyoto Protocol.

Executive Summary
6.1 Introduction (relationship between projects, regional and national
programs and national accounts; potential magnitude of activities in
terms of land area and carbon)
6.2 Specific issues arising from the implementation of biotic
activities (accounting units and procedures; baseline and
additionality questions; leakage; permanence; risks and risk management
strategies; associated costs, benefits and impacts, including employment)
6.3 Scientific and technical aspects of monitoring, evaluation and
verification (protocols, approaches, costs and practicalities;
uncertainties; pilot project experience)

Chapter 7: Implications of the Kyoto Protocol for the Reporting Guidelines
(10 pages)

This chapter will review the adequacy of the IPCC reporting guidelines for
the National Greenhouse Gas Inventories in light of the Kyoto Protocol
assess what changes may be required. It will also assess the scientific
and technical elements of an IPCC reporting framework for project-level
activities.

Executive Summary
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Review of relevance of the IPCC Guidelines for reporting activities
under the Kyoto Protocol (implications of proposed
definitions discussed in this Special Report;
country case studies)
7.2 Implications for potential additions and modifications to the IPCC
National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Guidelines
for different activities under the Kyoto Protocol
(elements for carbon stock accounting; periodicity of input data and
implications for assessing annual fluxes; alternative
methods and approaches to the Revised Guidelines;
potential additions and modifications to IPCC Modules for accounting)
7.4 Scientific and technical reporting framework for project-level
activities for greenhouse gases (elements for reporting project-level
activities; reporting monitoring and verification procedures; issues
related to consistency and comparability with national inventories;
integration of project with national inventories)
7.5 Supplementary information for reporting under the 1996 IPCC
National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Guidelines (identify major gaps
in knowledge)


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