Tuesday, March 20, 2012

2699.txt

date: Mon, 22 Oct 2007 08:55:30 -0400
from: epsl <hilst-epslatXYZxyz.EDU>
subject: Re: Reviewer Invitation for EPSL-D-07-00839
to: Phil Jones <p.jonesatXYZxyz.ac.uk>

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Thank you very much for the reviews, Phil. And I apologize for the
shape of the first one - with all the edits and so. This version was a
revision of an earlier one, which I had rejected. Effectively, it was a
copy to help me understand where the changes were made - but I should
have asked the authors to present a clean version. Mea Culpa. Best, Rob

Phil Jones wrote:

>
> Rob,
> Have just submitted my reviews for both papers. The second is much
> shorter, as
> all the comments here (Blanter et al) are the same as for the other
> paper. Authors
> will get all as they are the same 4 but in a different order.
> Both papers awful and should be rejected. They clearly don't know
> the climate
> literature - and like many seem not to want to accept that the
> climate is changing
> because of our emissions of greenhouse gases.
> Solar variability/climate relationships (use to be called
> solar/weather relationships)
> have generally been awful articles for decades. I'm not sure why
> Barrie Pittock decided to
> write the paper I referred to in 1983 (and the earlier one in 1978),
> but I'm glad he
> did. I have referred to this paper a few times in articles I've
> written, but I've
> referred to it much more in rejecting articles of this type.
> There is really only one paper where a solar influence on climate
> on decadal
> and longer timescales that has been shown to be possible (i.e. it
> passes Pittock's
> criteria).
>
> Cheers
> Phil
>
>
> At 12:26 18/10/2007, you wrote:
>
>> Dear Phil, that is what I thought also and that is indeed why I very
>> much appreciate you (and the other reviewers) having look at both of
>> them. I look forward to reading your report. Best, Rob
>> (Last Monday I spent 70 mins waiting for a commuter train that never
>> showed up - can be quite productive indeed, but very irritating also)
>>
>> Phil Jones wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> Rob,
>>> I've begun to look at them - train delay yesterday, so it may
>>> not be too long.
>>> There is also a lot of similarity between them, so it's not as
>>> though there were
>>> two independent papers.
>>>
>>> Cheers
>>> Phil
>>>
>>>
>>> At 12:03 15/10/2007, you wrote:
>>>
>>>> Dear Phil,
>>>>
>>>> I very much appreciate this -- thanks! If I have the reviews by
>>>> mid-November that would be great, but if you need more time, just
>>>> let me know.
>>>> Best,
>>>>
>>>> Rob
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Phil Jones wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Rob,
>>>>> I will try and do these two reviews. As there are two, it will
>>>>> likely take the
>>>>> full 21 days, but I do have some travel so will get a chance to
>>>>> read the pair.
>>>>>
>>>>> Best Regards
>>>>> Phil
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> At 20:28 13/10/2007, you wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> Ms. Ref. No.: EPSL-D-07-00839
>>>>>> Title: Evidence for Solar Forcing in Variability of Pressures and
>>>>>> Temperatures in Europe
>>>>>> Authors: Elena Blanter; Jean-Louis Le Mou�l; Mikhail Shnirman;
>>>>>> Vincent Emmanuel Courtillot, PhD
>>>>>> Journal: Earth and Planetary Science Letters
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Dear Phil,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This is the second part of my request. I hope you can help.
>>>>>> Since the two papers are closely related, I would very much
>>>>>> appreciate your views on the merit of two separate papers.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> If you are available to review this manuscript, please click on
>>>>>> the link below:
>>>>>> http://ees.elsevier.com/epsl/l.asp?i=23850&l=9KZXA957
>>>>>>
>>>>>> If you accept this invitation, I would be very grateful if you
>>>>>> would return your review within 21 days.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> If you are not available to review this manuscript, please click
>>>>>> on the link below. We would appreciate receiving suggestions for
>>>>>> alternative reviewers:
>>>>>> http://ees.elsevier.com/epsl/l.asp?i=23849&l=9H07Q3SG
>>>>>>
>>>>>> If you prefer, you may register your response to this invitation
>>>>>> online, by accessing the Elsevier Editorial System for Earth and
>>>>>> Planetary Science Letters as a REVIEWER:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> url: http://ees.elsevier.com/epsl/
>>>>>> Your username is: PJones-929
>>>>>> Your password is: jones26322
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Please select the "New Invitations" link on your Main Menu, then
>>>>>> choose to "Accept" or "Decline" this invitation, as appropriate.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> If you accept this invitation, you may submit your completed
>>>>>> review online at the above URL. There you will find spaces for
>>>>>> confidential comments to the editor and comments for the author.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> To assist you in the reviewing process, I am delighted to offer
>>>>>> you full access to Scopus* for 30 days. With Scopus you can
>>>>>> search for related articles, references and papers by the same
>>>>>> author. You may also use Scopus for your own purposes at any time
>>>>>> during the 30-day period. If you already use Scopus at your
>>>>>> institute, having this 30 day full access means that you will
>>>>>> also be able to access Scopus from home. Access instructions will
>>>>>> follow once you have accepted this invitation to review
>>>>>>
>>>>>> *Scopus is the world's largest abstract and citation database of
>>>>>> research information and quality internet sources.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> With kind regards,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Rob D. van der Hilst
>>>>>> Editor
>>>>>> Earth and Planetary Science Letters
>>>>>>
>>>>>> ABSTRACT:
>>>>>> We study the solar signature in the temporal evolution of
>>>>>> disturbances of European temperature and pressure in the 20th
>>>>>> century, using long series of daily data provided by
>>>>>> meteorological stations. We use three independent indices of
>>>>>> solar activity which exhibit similar evolution after 22-yr
>>>>>> running averaging. With the same 22-yr averaging, disturbances of
>>>>>> temperature and pressure are found to be dominated by wintertime
>>>>>> perturbations. The solar signature in the wintertime disturbances
>>>>>> is especially strong throughout the 20-th century and does not
>>>>>> weaken in the last decades, contrary to what happens for whole
>>>>>> year data. Disturbances of minimal temperature, pressure and wind
>>>>>> direction in the wintertime display remarkable similarity: All
>>>>>> these meteorological (actually almost climatic, given the 22-yr
>>>>>> averaging) characteristics closely follow the solar signature as
>>>>>> far as the winter season is concerned, even when little or no
>>>>>> correlation is observed for the whole year. We
>>>>>> discuss the particular features of European climate and speculate
>>>>>> on how solar forcing may manifest itself in other regions.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Prof. Phil Jones
>>>>> Climatic Research Unit Telephone +44 (0) 1603 592090
>>>>> School of Environmental Sciences Fax +44 (0) 1603 507784
>>>>> University of East Anglia
>>>>> Norwich Email p.jonesatXYZxyz.ac.uk
>>>>> NR4 7TJ
>>>>> UK
>>>>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> Prof. Phil Jones
>>> Climatic Research Unit Telephone +44 (0) 1603 592090
>>> School of Environmental Sciences Fax +44 (0) 1603 507784
>>> University of East Anglia
>>> Norwich Email p.jonesatXYZxyz.ac.uk
>>> NR4 7TJ
>>> UK
>>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>
>>>
>
> Prof. Phil Jones
> Climatic Research Unit Telephone +44 (0) 1603 592090
> School of Environmental Sciences Fax +44 (0) 1603 507784
> University of East Anglia
> Norwich Email p.jonesatXYZxyz.ac.uk
> NR4 7TJ
> UK
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
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