Sunday, April 1, 2012

3075.txt

date: Mon Jul 19 16:54:19 2004
from: Phil Jones <p.jonesatXYZxyz.ac.uk>
subject: Re: Fwd: Re: IAMAS session, Beijing 2005
to: "Michael E. Mann" <mannatXYZxyzginia.edu>

Mike,
I'll be in Beijing for IPCC in May05, so I'll have to skip this one. You could try
asking Jurg or maybe Christian Dullo. I don't reckon you'll need someone else though.
Cheers
Phil
At 08:05 19/07/2004 -0400, you wrote:

Hey Phil,
I forgot what your response was on this. Would you be interested in co-convening this
session in Beijing next August? If not, any suggestions for other possible European
co-conveners?
thanks,
mike
C9: Explaining the Climates of Historic Times: Detection and Attribution of
Anthropogenic Influences (organized by ICCL)
In the context of the detection and attribution of human influences on
climate, understanding the magnitude of natural climate variability is essential. The
instrumental record is relatively short and may be already contaminated by human
influences. It is thus vital to gain as much information as possible about past climatic
conditions, especially in the historical period of the past few millennia. This
symposium invites presentations on proxy climatic reconstructions of this period on
various timescales from interannual (e.g., from trees, historical records, ice cores,
corals, sponges, and lake sediments, etc.) to centennial (e.g., from sediment cores and
boreholes). Preference for oral presentation will be given both to the exploration of
new archives and to the integration of a number of different records together,
particularly from different proxies, and attempts to improve understanding of what
factors might have caused the variations seen in the millennium on the
decadal-to-century timescale. We also seek contributions that compare paleoclimate
reconstructions with results from climate models forced with estimates of past forcing
factors such as measures of solar output, the number and severity of
climatically-important volcanic eruptions, land-use changes, and influences of late
Holocene Earth-orbital changes.
Conveners:
Michael E. Mann, Department of Environmental Sciences, Clark Hall,
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA; Tel: +1-434-924-7770; Fax:
+1-434-982-2137; [1]mann@virginia.edu
Daoyi Gong, Institute of Resources Science, Beijing Normal University,
Beijing 100875, China; Tel: +86-10-6220-8144; Fax: +86-10-6220-0743; gdyatXYZxyzs.cn

Date: Tue, 04 May 2004 09:19:35 +0200
From: Keith Alverson <keith.alversonatXYZxyzes.unibe.ch>
Subject: Re: IAMAS session, Beijing 2005
X-Sender: alversonatXYZxyzcx.unibe.ch
To: "Michael E. Mann" <mannatXYZxyzginia.edu>
X-Virus-checked: by University of Berne
HI Mike,
Thanks I have penciled the session in with your name for a start. I'll try to find a
good Chinese and will wait to hear from Phil as to whether he is interested in
co-convening.
Keith

Hi Keith,
Thanks for getting in touch about this. I should be able to help do this. I'll let Phil
reply separately, but I suspect that IPCC duties may complicate his involvement (I'm
laying low this next round in IPCC--I'm not accepting any lead authorship
responsibilities)...
Would need to give some thought about an appropriate Chinese co-convener, although I
know there are several prominent Chinese paleoclimatologists, so this shouldn't be
difficult.
In the even that Phil can't do this, I would probably want to have at least one European
co-convener.
In the meantime, here is a prospective session description below adapted from a session
description Phi, Jean Jouzel, and I drafted for a very similar session we've been
running at EGS (now EGU) over the past several years...
mike
Explaining the Climates of Historic Times: Detection and Attribution of anthropogenic
influences
In the context of the detection and attribution of human influences on climate it is
vital to assess the magnitude of natural climate variability. The instrumental record is
relatively short and may be already contaminated by human influences. It is thus vital
to gain as much information as possible about past climates and in the above context the
historical period of the past few millennia may be most relevant. This symposium seeks
presentations on proxy climatic reconstructions of this period on various timescales
from interannual (eg from trees, historical records, ice cores, corals, sponges, and
lake sediments etc) to century ( eg from sediment cores). Preference will be given both
to the exploration of new archives and to the integration of a number of different
records together, particularly from different proxies, and attempts to improve
understanding of what factors might have caused the variations seen in the millennium on
the decadal-to-century timescale. We also seek contributions that compare paleoclimate
reconstructions with results from climate models forced with estimates of past forcing
factors such as measures of solar output, the number and severity of
climatically-important volcanic eruptions, land-use changes, and influences of late
Holocene earth-orbital changes.
At 11:22 AM 4/27/2004 +0200, Keith Alverson wrote:

Dear Mike and Phil,
I am trying to finalize the list of IAMAS climate sessions for the Assembly in Beijing,
2-11 August 2005. I wonder if either of both of you would be willing to run the
symposium on " Explaining the Climates of Historic Times: Detection and Attribution of
anthropogenic influences" - similar to the one you ran successfully at the last congress
in Sapporo. If so, I would simply need a paragraph description (attached the one from
Sapporo - MC16). Also, if you can suggest a Chinese co-chair that would be greatly
appreciated. I attach the list of ICCL symposia that I have so far for your perusal.
Further information on the meeting, and the PAGES meeting being held alongside, is here
([2]www.iamas.org and www.pages2005.org). I guess that given the combined IAMAS and
PAGES potential participants, such a session might really be quite exciting and well
attended. I look forward to hearing from you.
Keith
--
Keith Alverson
Executive Director, IGBP-PAGES, [3]www.pages-igbp.org
President, IAMAS International Commission on Climate, [4]www.iamas.org
Editor, EOS Transactions of the American Geophysical Union,
[5]http://www.agu.org/pubs/eos.html
PAGES International Project Office
Sulgeneckstrasse 38
3007, Bern, Switzerland
Tel: +41 31 312 3133
Fax: +41 31 312 3168
Mobile: +41 079 705 6536

______________________________________________________________
Professor Michael E. Mann
Department of Environmental Sciences, Clark Hall
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22903
_______________________________________________________________________
e-mail: mannatXYZxyzginia.edu Phone: (434) 924-7770 FAX: (434) 982-2137
[6]http://www.evsc.virginia.edu/faculty/people/mann.shtml

--

Keith Alverson
Executive Director, IGBP-PAGES, [7]www.pages-igbp.org
President, IAMAS International Commission on Climate, [8]www.iamas.org
Editor, EOS Transactions of the American Geophysical Union,
[9]http://www.agu.org/pubs/eos.html
PAGES International Project Office
Sulgeneckstrasse 38
3007, Bern, Switzerland
Tel: +41 31 312 3133
Fax: +41 31 312 3168
Mobile: +41 079 705 6536

______________________________________________________________
Professor Michael E. Mann
Department of Environmental Sciences, Clark Hall
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22903
_______________________________________________________________________
e-mail: mannatXYZxyzginia.edu Phone: (434) 924-7770 FAX: (434) 982-2137
[10]http://www.evsc.virginia.edu/faculty/people/mann.shtml

Prof. Phil Jones
Climatic Research Unit Telephone +44 (0) 1603 592090
School of Environmental Sciences Fax +44 (0) 1603 507784
University of East Anglia
Norwich Email p.jonesatXYZxyz.ac.uk
NR4 7TJ
UK
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