Friday, April 27, 2012

3568.txt

cc: schlesin@atmos.uiuc.edu, lempert@rand.org, Daniel.Sarewitz@asu.edu, p.jones@uea.ac.uk, shs@stanford.edu, wmw@ucar.edu, jmahlman@ucar.edu, manabe@splash.princeton.edu, m.hulme@uea.ac.uk, thomas.lowe@rmit.edu.au, penner@umich.edu, covey1@llnl.gov, wallace@atmos.washington.edu, jholdren@whrc.org, hjacoby@mit.edu, jhansen@giss.nasa.gov, schmidt@giss.nasa.gov, schlesin@atmos.uiuc.edu, wpatzert@jpl.nasa.gov, mmaccrac@comcast.net, omichael@princeton.edu, hareatXYZxyz-potsdam.de
date: Fri, 5 Jan 2007 13:45:54 -0600
from: Michael Schlesinger <schlesinatXYZxyzos.uiuc.edu>
subject: Re: a query to all...
to: Andy Revkin <anrevkatXYZxyzimes.com>

Andy:

You sent me your song in August 2005, a month I shall never forget.

The 5-4 'hanging-chad' decision is a real-world example of a bifurcation point from which
there can be no going back, this as witness by 3000 young American men and women lying in
their graves, with more to come.

What the United States needs to confront the challenges of human-induced climate change is
LEADERSHIP from its CEO.

Alas, we shall have to await 20 January 2009, at the earliest, for such Leadership.

Michael

a very very very poignant and true point, michael.
i have a song called "a very fine line" that explores all those facets of life like
that.
At 01:58 PM 1/5/2007, Michael Schlesinger wrote:

Andy:
Despite the large climatic diversity of the United States, which ranges from arctic
Alaska to tropical Hawaii, had the 5-to-4 'hanging-chad' decision of the U.S. Supreme
Court swung the other way, the U.S. would have confronted the challenges of
human-induced climate change these past 6 years, rather than deny and avoid them.
And, we would not now be mired in Iraq.
Michael

this'll be refreshing after our recent back-and-forths.
a quick question.
given that climate, for most folks, remains local... doing a short piece for weekend
assessing thesis that it's harder to build momentum for climate action in USA because
we're so darned large and climatically variegated (epic snow in rockies, balmy in
northeastern states, etc) compared to, say, Europe (which tends to experience a 'common'
climate, to some extent...)...
anyone thought about that much before?
happy to hear your thoughts (but promptly!)
ANDREW C. REVKIN
The New York Times / Environment
229 West 43d St., NY NY 10036
phone: 212-556-7326 / e-mail: revkinatXYZxyzimes.com / fax: 509-357-0965
Arctic book: The North Pole Was Here: www.nytimes.com/learning/globalwarming
Amazon book: The Burning Season www.islandpress.org/burning
Acoustic-roots band: www.myspace.com/unclewade

ANDREW C. REVKIN
The New York Times / Environment
229 West 43d St., NY NY 10036
phone: 212-556-7326 / e-mail: revkinatXYZxyzimes.com / fax: 509-357-0965
Arctic book: The North Pole Was Here: www.nytimes.com/learning/globalwarming
Amazon book: The Burning Season www.islandpress.org/burning
Acoustic-roots band: www.myspace.com/unclewade

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