Tuesday, May 8, 2012

4006.txt

date: Wed May 7 17:05:48 2008
from: Phil Jones <p.jonesatXYZxyz.ac.uk>
subject: Re: Nature review request - manuscript 2008-04-04235
to: k.ziemelisatXYZxyzure.com

Karl,
OK - send full ms, or details of where I can find the paper.
Cheers
Phil
At 16:47 07/05/2008, you wrote:

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Dear Professor Jones
A manuscript has been submitted to Nature, which we were hoping you would be interested
in reviewing. The manuscript comes from Alexander Stine, Peter Huybers, and Inez Fung
and is entitled "Changes in the Phase of the Annual Cycle of Surface Temperature". Its
first paragraph is pasted below.
Is this a paper that you would be able to review for us within 14 days? If so, please
let me know as soon as possible, and I will send instructions to you on how to access
the manuscript. Failing that, it would be helpful to us if you could suggest alternative
referees.
Nature's information for peer-reviewers is at
[1]www.nature.com/nature/authors/referees/index.html.
Many thanks in advance for your help; I look forward to hearing from you.
Yours sincerely
Karl Ziemelis
Physical Sciences Editor, Nature
Nature's author and policy information sites are at
[2]www.nature.com/nature/submit/.
Changes in the Phase of the Annual Cycle of Surface Temperature
Alexander Stine, Peter Huybers, and Inez Fung
The annual cycle in surface temperature is massive, larger than even the
glacial-interglacial cycles in most places on Earth. Trends in amplitude and phase of
the annual harmonic in surface temperature have been observed, but models predict the
opposite sign phase trend to that which is observed. Our understanding of natural
variability is poor making it difficult to assess the importance of observed trends.
Here we show that the phase of extratropical land shifted towards earlier seasons by 1.5
days from 1954-2006 and that this shift appears anomalous with respect to natural
variability. This shift is not seen over the ocean. No significant change in the
amplitude is found.
Please note that your contact details are being held on our editorial database which is
used only for this journal's management of the peer review process. If you would prefer
us not to contact you in the future please let us know by emailing nature@nature.com.
This email has been sent through the NPG Manuscript Tracking System NY-610A-NPG&MTS

Prof. Phil Jones
Climatic Research Unit Telephone +44 (0) 1603 592090
School of Environmental Sciences Fax +44 (0) 1603 507784
University of East Anglia
Norwich Email p.jonesatXYZxyz.ac.uk
NR4 7TJ
UK
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